Cancer Courses

Fall 2015        Spring 2016         Fall 2016

BIOE 199                ECE/BIOE 467                 KIN 494

BIOE 298                BIOE 479

BIOE 479                BIOE 498

CHLH 575              BIOE 498

FSHN 480              CHLH 502

MCB 400

 


Fall 2015

BIOE 199: FCR: Frontiers in Cancer Research

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
FCR63911LEC-DISC12:00–1:50 p.m.F1265 DCLRohit Bhargava

Credit: 1 hour

This discovery course will provide students with overviews of important topics in cancer research and how engineering education is needed to solve each problem. The weekly talks will be TED-style and designed to introduce students to a topic that helps them seek further knowledge. This is a limited-enrollment course.

BIOE 298: Healthcare Innovation & Translation

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
HIT65183LEC-DISC10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.F3211 DCLRohit Bhargava

Credit: 1 hour

This discovery course will feature lectures by internal and external experts on strategies in translating designs and healthcare policy, followed by facilitated class discussion to integrate knowledge. This is a limited-enrollment course.

BIOE 479: Cancer Nanotechnology

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
AL165568LEC-DISC3:30–4:50 p.m.Tu and ThAndrew Smith

Credit: 3 hours.

Applications in cancer and mechanobiology will provide an introduction to basic concepts in applications of nanotechnology in mechanobiology and in cancer. This is a highly interdisciplinary field of research where knowledge from various disciplines needs to be presented and integrated. The course will be a team-taught course by faculty in Engineering and LAS. There will be four main sections of the course: (1) biological concepts and cancer biology; (2) introduction to bottom nanotechnology and nanomedicine; (3) microfluidics, lab on a chip, and top-down nanotechnology; and (4) applications in cellular mechanics (i.e., mechanobiology and nanotechnology). The course will be targeted for first-year graduate students and senior undergraduate students.

Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: BIOE 206, CHEM 232.

CHLH 575: Chronic Disease Prevention

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
C159589LEC9:00–11:50 a.m.Tu1002 Huff HallDavid Buchner

Credit: 4 hours

Advanced course in population-based approaches to chronic disease prevention, with emphasis on policy and environmental strategies affecting lifestyle risk factors. Provides an understanding of common diseases, screen tests, community assessment, systematic evidence reviews, and evidence-based community interventions.

Prerequisite: MPH students or consent of instructor.

FSHN 480: Basic Toxicology

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
C37665LEC1:00–1:50 p.m.MWF242 Bevier HallMichael Biehl

Credit: 3 hours

Emphasizes basic toxicology principles and the pharmacokinetics, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, non-nutrient dietary supplements, and other compounds foreign to the body. Toxic effects on major target organ systems are discussed, including an introduction to how foreign compounds can initiate, enhance, or prevent the carcinogenic process. Briefly surveys diverse areas of toxicology, such as eco-, nano-, forensic, genetic, nutritional, clinical, and reproductive toxicology; review the federal regulatory aspects of safety assessment and consumer protection.

Prerequisite: Biochemistry MCB 450 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

MCB 400: Cancer Cell Biology

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
AL131654LEC12:30–1:50 p.m.Tu and Th217 Noyes LabSupriya Gangadharan Prasanth

Credit: 3 hours

Principles of eukaryotic cell biology with an emphasis on cancer cell biology; consideration of molecular and fine structural components of the cell with an emphasis on experimental analysis of the relationship of structure to function of gene, membrane, cytoskeleton, and extracellular matrix.

Prerequisite: MCB 250, MCB 251, MCB 252, MCB 253, and credit or concurrent registration in MCB 354 or MCB 450 or consent of instructor.

Spring 2016

ECE/BIOE 467: Biophotonics

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
A61522LEC9:30–10:50 a.m.Tu and Th3020 ECE BuildingStephen Boppart

Credit:

This survey course summarizes the interdisciplinary field of biophotonics and teaches the fundamentals and applications in three major areas. First, this course provides the fundamentals of light and matter, optics and optical imaging, lasers, cancer biology, pathology, and tissue histology, and tissue optical properties with light transport through biological tissue. Second, this course teaches the diagnostic applications of biophotonics; namely, optical biomedical imaging and microscopy techniques, optical biosensors, contrast agents, and spectroscopy. Third, this course teaches the therapeutic applications of biophotonics, including the fundamentals and mechanisms of light-tissue interactions, of tissue ablation via photochemical, photothermal, and photomechanical processes, and photodynamic therapy.

BIOE 479: Cancer Nanotechnology

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
AL165568LEC-DISC3:30–4:50 p.m.Tu and ThAndrew Smith

Credit: 3 hours.

Applications in cancer and mechanobiology will provide an introduction to basic concepts in applications of nanotechnology in mechanobiology and in cancer. This is a highly interdisciplinary field of research where knowledge from various disciplines needs to be presented and integrated. The course will be a team-taught course by faculty in Engineering and LAS. There will be four main sections of the course: (1) biological concepts and cancer biology; (2) introduction to bottom nanotechnology and nanomedicine; (3) microfluidics, lab on a chip, and top-down nanotechnology; and (4) applications in cellular mechanics (i.e., mechanobiology and nanotechnology). The course will be targeted for first-year graduate students and senior undergraduate students.

Approved for letter and S/U grading. Prerequisite: BIOE 206, CHEM 232.

BIOE 498: Imaging & Therapeutic Agents

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
DP60235LEC1:00–2:20 p.m.M and WDipanjan Pan

Credit: 3 hours

This course will introduce the principles of and prerequisites for clinical (MRI, CT, US, PET-SPECT) and preclinical (PAT, optical) imaging modalities and chemical strategies to develop exogenous probes for the early detection of molecular changes responsible for disease pathogenesis, such as cardiovascular, inflammatory, cancer, and neurological disorders.

BIOE 498: Systems Bioengineering

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
Systems Bioengineering60233LEC2:30–3:50 p.m.ThPrincess Imoukhuede
Systems Bioengineering60233LEC4:00–4:50 p.m.FPrincess Imoukhuede

Credit: 3 hours

Systems biology and bioengineering are emerging fields that require new minds that are adept at integrating biology with mathematics and computation. In this course, you will receive training in bimodal systems biology: (1) translating experimental observations into mathematical representations; (2) deterministic network model development, mathematical solution techniques, simulation, and prediction. These approaches will be presented in the context of tumor angiogenesis. Here, students will examine the angiogenic signaling pathways, and apply systems biology and bioengineering approaches to design new therapeutics targeting tumor vasculature.

CHLH 502: Cancer Epidemiology

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
RE62012LEC2:30–5:20 p.m.ThARR Huff HallKarin Rosenblatt

Credit: 4 hours

The class will address the investigation of the descriptive and analytic epidemiology of cancer. It will include information on the development of malignancy and characteristics of tumor cells . The advanced investigation of the relationship between various risk and protective factors and the development of different types of cancer will be discussed in an epidemiologic context. The role of primary prevention and secondary prevention (screening) will also be covered.

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent class in epidemiology or consent of instructor.

 

Fall 2016

KIN 494: Exercise Oncology

SectionCRNTypeTimesDaysLocationInstructor
KIN65094 (undergrad)
65093 (grad section)
LEC10:00–11:20 a.m.M and W108 Bevier HallLinda Trinh

Credit: 3 hours for undergraduate; 4 hours for graduate

This course is designed to provide an overview of the role of physical activity in cancer control. Specifically, the role of physical activity in prevention, coping with treatments, recovery after treatments, and survivorship will be examined. The course includes an examination of both the outcomes and determinants of physical activity, behavior change interventions, and the role of sedentary behavior for cancer control. The objectives of the course are to: (1) obtain a basic understanding of cancer including its epidemiology, treatments, and side effects, (2) gain a comprehensive understanding about the role of exercise for cancer survivors during and after treatment, (3) identify the key determinants of exercise and strategies for promoting exercise in cancer survivors, and (4) understand the effects of sedentary behavior for cancer prevention and survivorship. A multidisciplinary perspective will be taken drawing from kinesiology, oncology, epidemiology, psychology, rehabilitation medicine, and health promotion. Course emphasis will be placed on student participation, discussion, presentations, and a final research paper.